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Trusting Your Child

Natural Parenting: Trusting your childby Ela Forest It is natural to have fear for our children’s well-being, but there is no reason not to trust children to know their own limits. Everybody knows their limits much better than those around them. I know exactly how high I can jump, to what shelf I can reach or how big a hammer I can handle, and I don’t put myself in danger. The same goes for children, if we let...

Meeting Your Child’s Needs

Someone shared Jan Hunt‘s gardener metaphor on an unschooling list a while back and I wanted to share it here for anyone who may not have read it. It’s message is meeting your child’s underlying needs with patience and trust. “Imagine for a moment that you are visiting a plant nursery. You hear a commotion outside, so you investigate. You find a young assistant struggling with a rose bush. He is trying...

A Free Child Is A Happy Child

“There is, of course, this matter of being afraid to give freedom to young children. I believe they have that within themselves which makes it possible for them to meet the world and life and interpret it more nearly aright than can we. They carry with them that inheritance of faith and imagination undimmed; and that tremendous surging desire to know, to see, to feel and to do, which is rarely betrayed. In our desire...

Unschooling and Electronics

If you limit the time your child can play video games, be on the computer, or watch TV… WHY? I’m aware of many conventional reasons…er…excuses…. Have you ever really thought about it? I know that a lot of parents put limits on their children; it’s pretty typical in mainstream families because they rule and control everything. They use it as punishments and rewards. Many unschoolers that I know...

Talking To, And About Your Child Respectfully

It seems everywhere today, from tv news, to print, and even sit-coms, parents are being offered advice on how to talk to their kids. This advice usually comes with an agenda. How to talk to your kids so they’ll listen to you; so they’ll tell you what they’re up to; so they’ll take you seriously; so you can keep them safe; how to get them to do what you tell them and not do what you tell them not to...

50 Ways To Bring Out Your Child’s Best

There’s a lot of good tips in this list, such as #8 (especially the part about involving them), #26 and my favorite #50. 50 Ways to Bring Out Your Child’s Best Written by Thomas Armstrong, Ph.D. 1. Let your child discover her own interests. Pay attention the activities she chooses. This free-time play can say a lot about where her gifts lie. 2. Expose your child to a broad spectrum of experiences. They may...

If I Had My Child To Raise Over Again

If I had my child to raise over again, I’d finger paint more, and point the finger less. I’d do less correcting, and more connecting. I’d take my eyes off my watch, and watch with my eyes. I would care to know less, and know to care more. I’d take more hikes and fly more kites. I’d stop playing serious, and seriously play. I’d run through more fields, and gaze at more stars. I’d do...

Spiritual Parenting

I really enjoy the Spiritual Parenting newsletter by Mimi Doe and have been receiving it for quite some time. The title of the current one is ‘The Love That Listens”. Some of the highlights for me are: ASK… LISTEN… AND LISTEN DEEPER ASK…. Ask your child to make a list of all the things she wants to know more about. You may be very surprised. Follow through on this information and provider her with...

Taking Children Seriously

THE DAILY GROOVE ~ by Scott Noelle :: Taking Children Seriously :: We live in a society that doesn’t take children seriously. Sure, we care deeply about children’s welfare; we do our best to help them to grow into healthy, successful adults. But we, as a society, rarely take children seriously the way they take *themselves* seriously. To children, *play* is serious business — channeling enormous creative...

The Unprocessed Child: Living Without School

The Unprocessed Child is a work of nonfiction about a child raised with no coercion and no curriculum. Laurie Chancey spent her childhood immersing herself in topics of her own choosing. She was never forced to learn something simply because tradition and/or society said it was necessary. No one was looking over her shoulder to make sure she was learning the “proper” subjects. Having never seen a textbook or...